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The Internet of Where Things Are

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The Internet of Where Things Are


In the era for Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT), how will your company make decisions? Will you be using static graphs and tables covered ad infinitum in slide presentations? In some cases, that may suffice. More often than not, you’ll want to leverage the geographic information in the “Internet of Where Things Are” to allow better-informed decisions. Geographic context and its related visualization are important because they are really about people and the things they want and use. We use things, and we like things. We transit across and over things as we move from one thing to another or to other people. We all want to be more effective and efficient, but we still spend too much time trying to find things. By leveraging geographic understanding and the tools that allow one to visualize information geographically, companies can increase their
value by always being able to find their things, keep track of them and get them to people—customers—who want them or use them.
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Specific services:
Geographic Strategy: Whether working independently or as part of a team, Geographic Frontiers can ensure you develop a geographic strategy to compliment your Big Data and IoT initiatives. This is much more than simply deciding where to locate storefronts or production facilities. Our expertise will ensure you are selecting and leveraging the right geographic processes and applications to empower your decision-making and enhance your customer experience. Big Data and the IoT will provide information related to infrastructure management, inventory control, and customer behavior. A geographic strategy will ensure you have the tools and processes integrated into your company to give you the necessary geographic context for corporate decision-making. Components of this strategy include the following. If desired, any of these can be separated out and provided to your company “al a carte”.
  • Requirements definition and traceability: Geographic Frontiers takes a system engineering approach to identifying your geographic-related requirements. Working independently or as part of a team, we can develop a plan to ensure effective integration of geographic requirements into your Big Data and IoT strategies. Whether its customers, your company assets or the products you intend to sell, a viable geographic component is important to fully leveraging Big Data and the capability that IoT will bring to your company.
  • Geographic applications analysis: Geographic Frontiers will use its unbiased expertise to evaluate and recommend geographic information and visualization tools that will best fit your company’s needs while ensuring an integrated approach. The right geographic applications will provide you much more than just graphs and charts and will empower your decision-making.
  • Activity based analysis: Activity-based analysis brings multiple sources of data together and examines them in the context of geographic location and time. Geographic Frontiers can conduct this analysis on behalf of an agency or company, or we can train your personnel on the tools and techniques associated with this type of geographic analysis. IoT will allow you to better monitor the transactions that take place within your company and with your customers. The principles embedded in activity-based analysis result in better understanding of the implications of these transactions.
  • Geographic analysis of data from social media: Working with your company or agency to determine your requirements, Geographic Frontiers will document the type of information from social media that you can use and how it will assist decision-making. These strategies can be both passive and active. In the case of the later, these strategies will include public relations plans to encourage clientele or constituents to post geographically tagged data to you can better serve them.
  • Cyber and critical infrastructure analysis: Hand-in- glove with disaster planning is analysis of a company’s or an agency’s cyber and critical infrastructure. By analyzing how a company’s or an agency’s assets are arrayed geographically, the company can see how outages at or damages to a particular facility can impact overall operations. By associating various sites to utility and service providers, a company or an agency will be able to see the implications on their operations if a particular provider experiences problems. This analysis will allow companies and agencies to develop more effective contingency and continuity of operations plans and even point to the need to change service providers to reduce risk to overall operations.
  • Disaster planning and risk assessment: By looking at historic trends, companies can assess the risk of either a specific location, or overall corporate assets, to natural disaster. Tied with a critical infrastructure analysis, these disaster assessments can examine a company’s overall risk to natural disasters and guide contingency and continuity of operations planning to mitigate the effects of a disaster or a severe weather event. Whether making an investment in a new facility or recognizing the need to improve an existing facility, these assessments assist company decision-making by analyzing a specific location. This analysis incorporates such things physical geography to assess site security measures, relationship to surrounding infrastructure, and proximity to workforce or intended clientele. Socio-economic data such as crime rates, education and income levels, surrounding property values and cultural issues can be assessed. These issues are particularly important for overseas locations.
Socio-cultural analysis from a geographic perspective: If a company is moving into a new location, particularly overseas, a socio-cultural analysis will provide valuable perspectives to the culture, attitudes, and affiliations of people in the region surrounding the new location or locations. Unlike the usual, generic cultural analysis, this analysis will show how these cultural delineations relate “on the map” to proposed corporate activities. The same approach can be used to assess a company’s suppliers. In this increasingly connected world, companies want to avoid suppliers with lax safety, environmental, and workforce practices.

Geographic analysis training: While various geographic information system vendors offer training specific to their software, this training goes several steps farther by training a company’s or an agency’s personnel to develop the “why” and “how” of geographic analysis. It shows them how to consider the temporal aspects of geographic analysis, assess cultural perspectives tied to location and to bring various types of information into the geographic context to produce more comprehensive analysis to support company or agency decision-making. Rather than “one size fits all”, we tailor our training to the specific needs of your company or agency.